Friday, October 06, 2006

One City; 194 Countries

Photographer Danny Goldfield set out to photograph one child from every country on the planet. The only catch was that they all had to live in New York City. Goldfield's finished product proves that the Statue of Liberty is still in the right place:


6 comments:

Atalanta said...

I've just watched your video about your project of finding and photographing children from 194 countries in New York city, and think --FEEL --it is a profoundly restorative experience. In these days of anxiety about the environment, global crises, war, oppression, and sometimes unbearable grief, you portray the roots of our humanity in these open, beautiful, and trusting faces. These children, just by being themselves, and looking at us through your lens, are powerful reminders of the commitment we need to make to ensure the best future possible for them.

Mitali Perkins said...

Atalanta, I felt the same way when I saw this video; that's why I posted it on my blog. It's not my project, though. I wish it were. In this post-9/11 era with immigration debates raging around us, every city and town in the States should showcase their children born outside the country. Let's make it a national project. Anyway, you may forward your wonderful comment to the photographer via Good Magazine, the organization that produced this video.

Tockla said...

I LOVE this! Thanks so much for finding it and posting it.

And related to your previous post, I'd be curious to hear your thoughts on Jack Straw's comments. I've been following the debate with great interest. I've found the comments people have added to the various editorials on The Guardian ranging widely - and am glad to see a discussion taking place. The fear is that it will lead to further polarization rather than openness.

Mitali Perkins said...

I'm a strong proponent of religious liberty. As long as we don't cause harm or danger to each other, practice your faith freely and boldly and I will practice mine. How does the wearing of qitab cause harm and danger to others?

As for Straw's desire to have "face-to-face" interaction with his constituents, you can listen to a person without seeing her face. You can hear pain in her voice, and you can see her eyes, the windows of the soul. I have interacted with women in burkah; we have laughed together and shared our stories. Im sure Straw can do the same if he gives it a try.

Christy Lenzi said...

Mitali, thanks for posting this video--it's a brilliant idea and lovely to watch.

Mitali Perkins said...

Very sweet and simple, isn't it? "Let the little children come to me and hinder them not."

Post a Comment