Friday, October 13, 2006

Muhammad Yunus and the Nobel Peace Prize

I'm thrilled to share the news that Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank have won the Nobel Peace Prize for their work in eradicating poverty. Since you're reading this on my fire escape, here's the me connection: I got to meet (and introduce) Dr. Yunus in Dhaka, Bangladesh, when I emceed a book launch party for my friend Alex Counts and his book, Give Us Credit. Alex (now the President of the Grameen Foundation), is acknowledged with thanks in my forthcoming novel for middle readers, Rickshaw Girl (Charlesbridge), which is based on Grameen's work in rural Bangladesh. (In the book, I show how access to credit makes an immense difference for poor women, especially in the life of an eleven-year-old girl named Naima.) Okay, enough about me -- back to the real news. For more information on Grameen and how to get involved in serving the poor by providing credit, visit the Grameen Foundation's website.

7 comments:

Pooja said...

Awesome marketing angle ;). I can't wait to read it.

literary safari said...

Grameen's work has really set the stage for microfinance development programs all over the world. It's so gratifying to see it acknowledged in this major context. I agree with Pooja -what a fortunate timely connection to your book!

Susan said...

This is very cool news. One of my cousins is very involved with a Grameen bank in Mexico.

Ken Liffiton @ Grameen Foundation said...

Thanks for your enthusiasm and support; this is truly a great time for microfinance. At Grameen Foundation we've already seen a great outpouring of support from around the world; we hope it will continue and enable us to reach even more of the world's poorest. Good timing with your book; I hope it meets with great success.

Mitali Perkins said...

I remember dreaming big dreams as a kid of putting an end to poverty and hunger. Somewhere along the line, I "grew up," "faced facts," and grasped "the overwhelming magnitude of the problem." But the awarding of this Prize has re-awakened my hopes again. Wouldn't it be wonderful, in our lifetime, if no child on the planet died of hunger? Why is that impossible? It shouldn't be!

Leslie said...

Mitali,
Is Rickshaw Girl at a 4th grade reading level? My daughter's class is talking a lot about erradicating world poverty and I think her teacher would be very interested in your book.

Mitali Perkins said...

Yes, Leslie, it's definitely manageable for fourth graders.

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